Ian Larnach Associates

Ian Larnach Associates

Ian Larnach Associates were formed by Ian Larnach in 2002 and were dedicated to Constructing Excellence and Egan Principles. Its intention was to drive forward with the introduction and delivery of new innovative products, systems and new ways of working from within the supply chain.

From early involvement with projects it provided a valuable service to the client, architects and engineers, working as part of the team to overcome specific product related issues. The companies ethic was to work hard ensuring that it successful and consider close involvement with projects as a vital ingredient. That always remained a priority on its part.

It had a proven track record with strong sustainable working relationships within the client client base, many of which still have a working relationship with CDI. It worked closely with designers, engineers, contractors, house builder’s, local authorities and RSL’s, assisting not only in the delivery of new methods of construction but also driving out waste. ILA strived to deliver innovation as the company strongly believe this was as still is an essential ingredient to continual success and prosperity – for any company, large or small.

The Code for Sustainable Homes was a major challenge to designers and developers alike. As Code Assessors ILA was able to assist with design issues and provide the necessary assessments to achieve accreditation.

To achieve its objectives Ian, and then Chris as well when he joined, networked at all levels within the supply chain, covering a vast cross section of specialist products& systems. By working closely with specialist manufacturers (each with their own range of innovative solutions) it allowed ILA to offer advice at various stages of the construction cycle. By drawing on the un-tapped wealth of expertise available from our supply chain associates ILA was able to provide access to resource above and beyond the normal capability of its clients.

 

ILA

 

Ian has a vast supply chain experience with over 36 years in the Construction Industry. Prior to setting up ILA he spent 26 years as a Builders Merchant.

The early years of his career Ian worked with JT Atkinson & Sons, Hartlepool, an independent heavy side Builders Merchant with six regional depots, progressing through the ranks to Depot and then Regional Manager before setting up JTA’s first Contracts Division.

In 1990 Ian moved on to join James Burrell Builders Merchants based in Gateshead as Divisional Manager to assist the company with there ambitious expansion programme. Firstly opening up new depots and trading areas in Teesside and York and then moving to head office as Business Development Director. In 1999, following the Egan report, Ian began to research the rapidly changing procurement methods sweeping through the industry and set about to produce a detailed action plan enabling James Burrell to be at the forefront of ‘Strategic Partnering within the Supply Chain’. As result James Burrell’s are now widely respected on a national basis and considered by many to be the market leaders with this style of innovative approach.

In 1999 Ian was elected as Chairman of the Builders Merchants Federation North East and during his two year stint in the chair spent as much time as possible encouraging BMF members to change working practices and embrace news ways of working. In 2000 he became involved with Construction Industry Best Practice Programme becoming the first Builders Merchant to join the Movement for Innovation (M4i). In August 2000 he was invited to join the inaugural board of Constructing Excellence North East.

Ian is married with two children, five grandchildren and resides in Spennymoor, County Durham in his native North East. Ian has always been a keen sportsman, representing his county at Football and Athletics as a schoolboy before a short career as a Professional Footballer. Ian still plays competitive sport but nowadays this only stretches to golf!

Ian retired fully from CDI in the early part of 2016 to look after his health following a second Cancer diagnosis and spends a lot of his time raising funds for charity through Ian Larnach Cancer Care Charities. Over the years Ian has raised tens of thousands of pounds for good causes and this figure continues to rise.

FAQs

Ask CDI a Question

  • Q

    Do I keep my joist centres at 400mm when using Lewis Deck?

    A

    One of the great things about using Lewis Deck is that it opens up a number of different options for you and one of them is around joist centres you can work with.

    Traditionally we see the vast majority of architects and designers insisting that timber joists be installed at either 400mm or at most 600mm because this is the limit of what timber floor systems will effectively span to. Now with Lewis, because of its unique profile (with the dovetails dimensions) and the way it interacts with the thin (50mm) screed laid on it, you can actually go much wider than these figures. With a 50mm screed, on top of the sheets, Lewis allows you to have unpropped centres of up to 1200mm (1.2m). Even at these much wider centres Lewis will allow you to have a permissible load of 14.8kN/m2, which in English is just under 1.5 Tonnes per m2. Now this might sound fantastic, and it is, but in reality for 95% of new build homes this figure won't really make too much difference to what you were planning on doing with upstairs. What it does mean though is that at your normal centres, of approximately 600mm, your floor becomes so much stronger than traditional forms of floor structure that it allows you to do things on the 1st floor that you take for granted on the ground floor. First of all is the obvious one, you get a solid floor, meaning no more squeaky floor boards or hearing people walking around upstairs and knowing exactly where they are up there! Having the solid floor gives you the chance to have a very efficient underfloor heating system (see our applications section for more details) which in most cases will probably mean a slight reduction in your fuel bills. Other big benefits of having a stronger floor upstairs include being able to have either thinner tiles or much heavier tiles than you can use on timber floor systems. The screed and Lewis working together pretty much stops any deflection in the floor meaning that these types of tiles won't crack or move and lift over time as the floor doesn't move or deflect! So in conclusion yes you can have much wider joist centres than the 400mm centres that you normally see on new developments but even if you wanted to keep them the same by using Lewis Deck it opens up so many benefits that you just aren't able to incorporate with traditional timber floor systems.

    Q

    Do you fix Lewis Deck down to the joists?

    A

    The short answer to this is no Lewis Deck doesn't have to be fixed down.

    Generally the reason why people choose to use Lewis Deck over more traditional floor systems is that they are looking to enhance the upper floor that they are working on. So if you are going to be looking at using Lewis then you might as well look to incorporate its full range of benefits. One of which is the major uplift in acoustic performance that you get from using the system. Getting the best results, acoustically, is achieved by laying the floor as a floating floor. This then creates separation between the supporting floor joists and and the steel deck. To enhance this further introduce a resilient strip on top of the joist. See below. [caption id="attachment_559" align="alignnone" width="300"]Lewis Metal Dovetailed Sheeting Deck with acoustic Sylomer resilient strips Lewis Metal Dovetailed Sheeting Deck with acoustic Sylomer resilient strips[/caption] When it comes to determining which of our acoustic resilient strips to use (because we have a few of them and they all do different jobs depending on the use of them and the type of structure below) we are happy to help you come up with the correct option that suits your project the best. A standard Lewis Deck floor detail (such as the detail above) easily achieves UK requirements for acoustic (as well as fire) resistance for residential separating floors. Higher performance standards are easily achievable too. Because of this we have seen Lewis Deck used frequently in in bespoke projects such as live music/ theatre venues, cinemas, recording studios, specialist test labs, plant room floors and many other commercial applications. Also as well improving improving the noise reduction between floors by not having to fix the sheets down you are massively speeding up the installation process!! Having to spend less time on site could have a positive knock on effect on the cost of your project. Please feel free to give us a call and discuss this further should you wish to do so.

    Q

    Lacomet – How come it has no scrap value?

    A

    Lacomet – How come it has no scrap value? Many of the projects that we get involved in starts with a phone call or email to us from someone researching replacing stolen leadwork. Many of these are old buildings, such as schools or churches, where this isn’t the first time that the lead has been stolen and they call us fed up with having to replace it again full in the knowledge that they will more than likely go through the same problem once more in the near future if they continue to use lead. One of the big benefits that Lacomet FL brings to a project is the fact that it has no scrap value and therefore the chances of it being stolen are massively reduced. Due to the 2 thin aluminium layers, and its five layer total construction, it is of no value to thieves. Lacomet can be recycled but the polyester based coating would need to be de-laminated first and the amount of recovered aluminum is then very low, in fact it would be easier and more profitable to collect empty drinks cans than to mess about stripping Lacomet down. We can also supply stickers that can be placed in strategic locations informing people that what is now on the roof is not lead and that it has no scrap value.

  • Q

    Do you fix Lewis Deck down to the joists?

    A

    The short answer to this is no Lewis Deck doesn't have to be fixed down.

    Generally the reason why people choose to use Lewis Deck over more traditional floor systems is that they are looking to enhance the upper floor that they are working on. So if you are going to be looking at using Lewis then you might as well look to incorporate its full range of benefits. One of which is the major uplift in acoustic performance that you get from using the system. Getting the best results, acoustically, is achieved by laying the floor as a floating floor. This then creates separation between the supporting floor joists and and the steel deck. To enhance this further introduce a resilient strip on top of the joist. See below. [caption id="attachment_559" align="alignnone" width="300"]Lewis Metal Dovetailed Sheeting Deck with acoustic Sylomer resilient strips Lewis Metal Dovetailed Sheeting Deck with acoustic Sylomer resilient strips[/caption] When it comes to determining which of our acoustic resilient strips to use (because we have a few of them and they all do different jobs depending on the use of them and the type of structure below) we are happy to help you come up with the correct option that suits your project the best. A standard Lewis Deck floor detail (such as the detail above) easily achieves UK requirements for acoustic (as well as fire) resistance for residential separating floors. Higher performance standards are easily achievable too. Because of this we have seen Lewis Deck used frequently in in bespoke projects such as live music/ theatre venues, cinemas, recording studios, specialist test labs, plant room floors and many other commercial applications. Also as well improving improving the noise reduction between floors by not having to fix the sheets down you are massively speeding up the installation process!! Having to spend less time on site could have a positive knock on effect on the cost of your project. Please feel free to give us a call and discuss this further should you wish to do so.

    Q

    Lacomet – How come it has no scrap value?

    A

    Lacomet – How come it has no scrap value? Many of the projects that we get involved in starts with a phone call or email to us from someone researching replacing stolen leadwork. Many of these are old buildings, such as schools or churches, where this isn’t the first time that the lead has been stolen and they call us fed up with having to replace it again full in the knowledge that they will more than likely go through the same problem once more in the near future if they continue to use lead. One of the big benefits that Lacomet FL brings to a project is the fact that it has no scrap value and therefore the chances of it being stolen are massively reduced. Due to the 2 thin aluminium layers, and its five layer total construction, it is of no value to thieves. Lacomet can be recycled but the polyester based coating would need to be de-laminated first and the amount of recovered aluminum is then very low, in fact it would be easier and more profitable to collect empty drinks cans than to mess about stripping Lacomet down. We can also supply stickers that can be placed in strategic locations informing people that what is now on the roof is not lead and that it has no scrap value.

Ask CDI a Question

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