Ecobuild 2017

Ecobuild 2017

7th - 9th March 2017, EXCEL Arena, Londons Docklands

March is always a busy time for us. Not only is it a lot of companies end of year (so we seem to get inundated with last minute orders!) but it’s also our busiest month when it comes to trade shows, and it begins with the biggest one we do, Ecobuild.

Ecobuild, held at Londons EXCEL arena, is the leading exhibition and conference for construction, design and energy in the built environment, attracting over 33,000 high calibre, senior level decision makers and influencers from architects and developers, to local government and major infrastructure clients (their words not mine).

As for all of the exhibitions that we do the logistics of getting us there always prove to entertaining and there’s always something that either gets forgotten or lost as we transport 7 or 8 models and displays from our warehouse down to the capital. This year we’d even left it late to book a hotel for us to stay in! Fortunately we were still able to get into the hotel we’ve stayed at over the last couple of years.

So on the Monday before the show I’m up at the crack of dawn and drive up to the office from where I live down in Lancashire. By mid morning we’ve picked the van up and after some fun and games getting the displays into the van we are set and ready to go just before noon. Each year we select one of our systems that we want to have as the focal point for the show. This year we decided that our Op-Deck system was to be the one that we’d focus on. So in the run up to the show we had a cracking new model made on a much bigger display box than we have had in the past. Sounds good I hear you say! Yes, but as this system is topped off with a nice section of concrete we’d completely forgotten (and by that I mean hadn’t even considered) how heavy this thing was going to be! Watching 3 (oldish) blokes trying to pick this thing up and put it into the back of a transit van was a thing of comedy gold.

20170306_184755 Our new Op-Deck model in place (eventually).

Anyway, following a quick bite to eat we were off heading south on the A1 on our 250 plus mile journey to the Docklands. Fortunately for me Chris decided he was driving as I’d done a 2 hour drive already that morning.

As far as journeys go it was pretty uneventful and we were down and ready to unload for around 5.30pm (this included our traditional taking the wrong lane on the last roundabout before getting to EXCEL).

Now for the fun part, how the hell do we get the Op-Deck model out of the van when we are a man down?? After a bit of quick thinking from me I managed to persuade a forktruck driver to give us 30 seconds of his time and lift said (heavy) display down for us, in the process saving us a good half hour of messing around and potentially dropping the thing and destroying it.

So with that taken care of we were all done and dusted and ready for the start of the show by 7pm. So after dumping the van at the EXCEL we were off on the tube across to Greenwich to our hotel.

 

Ecobuild is a 3 day show and with it being classed as the leading exhibition to be at we are fortunate to be joined by our European partners Reppel bv. This year we were joined by Reginald van Dooremalen, Reppels Sales and Marketing Manager, and for the 3 days the 3 of us for, the most part, we were ridiculously busy.

It’s always hard to tell, when you are there, how busy it is and which day was the best in terms of talking to people. You only really get a sense of that when you sit back when the show is over and carry out a full review of the amount of people you’ve scanned, how many business cards you’ve given out or received from people, and how many brochures from each system have you given out.

However saying that, this year right from the first hour on Tuesday morning we seemed to be busy right up until the last hour or so on the afternoon. This was the same for the Wednesday and Thursday too.

I was even lucky enough this year to be interviewed by a marketing agency that works specifically in the construction industry. Pauley Creative were spending the first 2 days of the show interviewing exhibitors on why they were at Ecobuild and we decided to get involved and give it ago. The video is attached below and other than looking older than I thought I looked I think it went well, considering the questions were asked cold without me knowing what they were going to be beforehand!

Overall the show went incredibly well. The number of leads that we got and the quality of people that we were able to talk to over the 3 day period of the show was of the highest quality. We know we are getting through to people and getting them to understand where we fit in and how our systems benefit projects when we get comments back like “I’d never thought of doing an upstairs this way before” or “you’ve taught me something new, I’m so pleased we came to talk to you”.

The best comment that we get though is the “we’ve specifically came to the show to talk to you guys and I’m really pleased that we did” and from the amount of times we got that comment during these 3 days we know we had a successful show.

We’re already looking forward to 2018.

20170309_173700 Packed away and ready for home.

 

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FAQs

Ask CDI a Question

  • Q

    Do I keep my joist centres at 400mm when using Lewis Deck?

    A

    One of the great things about using Lewis Deck is that it opens up a number of different options for you and one of them is around joist centres you can work with.

    Traditionally we see the vast majority of architects and designers insisting that timber joists be installed at either 400mm or at most 600mm because this is the limit of what timber floor systems will effectively span to. Now with Lewis, because of its unique profile (with the dovetails dimensions) and the way it interacts with the thin (50mm) screed laid on it, you can actually go much wider than these figures.With a 50mm screed, on top of the sheets, Lewis allows you to have unpropped centres of up to 1200mm (1.2m). Even at these much wider centres Lewis will allow you to have a permissible load of 14.8kN/m2, which in English is just under 1.5 Tonnes per m2. Now this might sound fantastic, and it is, but in reality for 95% of new build homes this figure won't really make too much difference to what you were planning on doing with upstairs.What it does mean though is that at your normal centres, of approximately 600mm, your floor becomes so much stronger than traditional forms of floor structure that it allows you to do things on the 1st floor that you take for granted on the ground floor.First of all is the obvious one, you get a solid floor, meaning no more squeaky floor boards or hearing people walking around upstairs and knowing exactly where they are up there! Having the solid floor gives you the chance to have a very efficient underfloor heating system (see our applications section for more details) which in most cases will probably mean a slight reduction in your fuel bills.Other big benefits of having a stronger floor upstairs include being able to have either thinner tiles or much heavier tiles than you can use on timber floor systems. The screed and Lewis working together pretty much stops any deflection in the floor meaning that these types of tiles won't crack or move and lift over time as the floor doesn't move or deflect!So in conclusion yes you can have much wider joist centres than the 400mm centres that you normally see on new developments but even if you wanted to keep them the same by using Lewis Deck it opens up so many benefits that you just aren't able to incorporate with traditional timber floor systems. However the joist centres are usually controlled by the load capacity of the joist and not the spanning capacity of the Lewis Deck.

    Q

    Do you fix Lewis Deck down to the joists?

    A

    The short answer to this is no Lewis Deck doesn't have to be fixed down.

    Generally the reason why people choose to use Lewis Deck over more traditional floor systems is that they are looking to enhance the upper floor that they are working on. So if you are going to be looking at using Lewis then you might as well look to incorporate its full range of benefits. One of which is the major uplift in acoustic performance that you get from using the system.Getting the best results, acoustically, is achieved by laying the floor as a floating floor. This then creates separation between the supporting floor joists and and the steel deck. To enhance this further introduce a resilient strip on top of the joist. See below.[caption id="attachment_559" align="alignnone" width="300"]Lewis Metal Dovetailed Sheeting Deck with acoustic Sylomer resilient strips Lewis Metal Dovetailed Sheeting Deck with acoustic Sylomer resilient strips[/caption]When it comes to determining which of our acoustic resilient strips to use (because we have a few of them and they all do different jobs depending on the use of them and the type of structure below) we are happy to help you come up with the correct option that suits your project the best.A standard Lewis Deck floor detail (such as the detail above) easily achieves UK requirements for acoustic (as well as fire) resistance for residential separating floors. Higher performance standards are easily achievable too. Because of this we have seen Lewis Deck used frequently in in bespoke projects such as live music/ theatre venues, cinemas, recording studios, specialist test labs, plant room floors and many other commercial applications.Note: some joists my require lateral stability and therefore lateral restraint straps or timber noggins or a sacrificial timber board may be required to achieve this, your joist supplier or designer will be able to provide this information, in some cases the Lewis Deck can be fixed down to provide this action if required.Please feel free to give us a call and discuss this further should you wish to do so.

    Q

    Lacomet – How come it has no scrap value?

    A

    Lacomet – How come it has no scrap value?Many of the projects that we get involved in starts with a phone call or email to us from someone researching replacing stolen leadwork. Many of these are old buildings, such as schools or churches, where this isn’t the first time that the lead has been stolen and they call us fed up with having to replace it again full in the knowledge that they will more than likely go through the same problem once more in the near future if they continue to use lead.One of the big benefits that Lacomet FL brings to a project is the fact that it has no scrap value and therefore the chances of it being stolen are massively reduced.Due to the 2 thin aluminium layers, and its five layer total construction, it is of no value to thieves. Lacomet can be recycled but the polyester based coating would need to be de-laminated first and the amount of recovered aluminum is then very low, in fact it would be easier and more profitable to collect empty drinks cans than to mess about stripping Lacomet down. We can also supply stickers that can be placed in strategic locations informing people that what is now on the roof is not lead and that it has no scrap value.

  • Q

    Do you fix Lewis Deck down to the joists?

    A

    The short answer to this is no Lewis Deck doesn't have to be fixed down.

    Generally the reason why people choose to use Lewis Deck over more traditional floor systems is that they are looking to enhance the upper floor that they are working on. So if you are going to be looking at using Lewis then you might as well look to incorporate its full range of benefits. One of which is the major uplift in acoustic performance that you get from using the system.Getting the best results, acoustically, is achieved by laying the floor as a floating floor. This then creates separation between the supporting floor joists and and the steel deck. To enhance this further introduce a resilient strip on top of the joist. See below.[caption id="attachment_559" align="alignnone" width="300"]Lewis Metal Dovetailed Sheeting Deck with acoustic Sylomer resilient strips Lewis Metal Dovetailed Sheeting Deck with acoustic Sylomer resilient strips[/caption]When it comes to determining which of our acoustic resilient strips to use (because we have a few of them and they all do different jobs depending on the use of them and the type of structure below) we are happy to help you come up with the correct option that suits your project the best.A standard Lewis Deck floor detail (such as the detail above) easily achieves UK requirements for acoustic (as well as fire) resistance for residential separating floors. Higher performance standards are easily achievable too. Because of this we have seen Lewis Deck used frequently in in bespoke projects such as live music/ theatre venues, cinemas, recording studios, specialist test labs, plant room floors and many other commercial applications.Note: some joists my require lateral stability and therefore lateral restraint straps or timber noggins or a sacrificial timber board may be required to achieve this, your joist supplier or designer will be able to provide this information, in some cases the Lewis Deck can be fixed down to provide this action if required.Please feel free to give us a call and discuss this further should you wish to do so.

    Q

    Lacomet – How come it has no scrap value?

    A

    Lacomet – How come it has no scrap value?Many of the projects that we get involved in starts with a phone call or email to us from someone researching replacing stolen leadwork. Many of these are old buildings, such as schools or churches, where this isn’t the first time that the lead has been stolen and they call us fed up with having to replace it again full in the knowledge that they will more than likely go through the same problem once more in the near future if they continue to use lead.One of the big benefits that Lacomet FL brings to a project is the fact that it has no scrap value and therefore the chances of it being stolen are massively reduced.Due to the 2 thin aluminium layers, and its five layer total construction, it is of no value to thieves. Lacomet can be recycled but the polyester based coating would need to be de-laminated first and the amount of recovered aluminum is then very low, in fact it would be easier and more profitable to collect empty drinks cans than to mess about stripping Lacomet down. We can also supply stickers that can be placed in strategic locations informing people that what is now on the roof is not lead and that it has no scrap value.

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