We’ve a new model down at Swindon!

We’ve a new model down at Swindon!

New wet room model introduced at the National Homebuilding and Renovation Centre, Swindon.

One of the great benefits that you get from introducing Lewis Deck into a residential development is the option to install a wet room floor into bathroom/ en-suite areas with extreme ease compared to other flooring systems as well as maintaining one solid concrete slab in the room reducing the possibility of leaks from a number of different materials being used to create the floor.

When we talk about the benefits of what Lewis brings to a project this seems to be one of the benefits that seems to get lost in conversation with people generally wanting the acoustic or solid floor improvements before anything else. However, over the last few months (with us spending a lot of time at trade shows) both myself and Chris have been having more and more conversations with people looking to add that little bit extra to their bathroom areas by having wet rooms rather than traditional bathroom and shower areas.

This posed us a bit of a dilemma, how do we get the point across to people that Lewis is the material of choice when it comes to thinking about upper floor wet rooms.

The answer, Swindon.

As has been mentioned in a number of different places on this website we have a permanent stand at the National Selfbuild and Renovation Centre in Swindon.

This is it!!

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES  (and this is what the stand looked like last week)

Stand E171 was, once upon a time, shared between ourselves and Gyvlon, the screed manufacturer. Earlier this year however, Gyvlon decided that they no longer wanted to share the stand so we took over the whole (even though it’s only small) thing!

With us being based in the north east we needed a reason to go down to Wiltshire and replace the bottom model with something new so this was the perfect time, and the perfect reason, to go down and update what we have down there.

So, a couple of weeks ago we set the plan into motion. First of all we needed old timbers to replicate joists in a house. Chris found the local timber reclamation yard and off we went to pick up a few bit of wood from it. When we got there it was closed!! Who knew Google told you when businesses were open and closed!

We eventually got going and over the next week or so the new model started to take shape.

One of the things that we wanted to do with this new model was show people how easy it is to install a drain into the Lewis and then create the falls to allow the room to function as it should. With that in mind below you’ll see a number of photos showing you how easy it is to install a drain into Lewis then create the falls!!

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Firstly cut a hole through the steel deck large enough for the waste pipes to fit through. I say large enough seen as though the first time we did it the hole was just too small!

At this point the waste pipe can be inserted into the deck and the drain fixed into position within the drain as below.

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Once the drain is in place ensure that the whole connection is sealed and that the hole that was cut into the steel is also sealed completely. This then ensures that no concrete screed leaks through any gaps when it is poured.

Once all the sealant is dry you can then look to install the concrete screed. Care must be taken to ensure that the concrete fully runs underneath the drain. In this case as we have used a slot drain we made sure that we forced the concrete completely under the whole of the drain. If this isn’t done correctly then there is a chance that as the concrete dries and cures that is slips and finds the gaps that haven’t been filled. This then causes shallow areas that will need to be filled with a levelling compound before the floor finishes are added.

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Follow the screed instructions on curing and drying before attempting to start sealing the floor and adding the floor finishes.

Simple job to finish the floor. Tank and seal the concrete, then tile ensuring that the fall on the floor is maintained and that the water follows gravity into the drain.

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And here’s our finished model sat in the warehouse ready to be taken down to Swindon.20170512_142708

You’ll have no doubt noticed that we’ve added underfloor heating pipes into our model. This is because one of the big benefits of using Lewis is the underfloor heating system works much efficiently with the Deck than with other systems.

Here we are showing our new thinner screed/ UFH system with a 10mm pipe within a minimum 36mm screed. This then allows for less weight and also less thickness for renovation projects where you are dealing with older joists that may not be able to hold the loads that new joists can.

All that was left for us to do was transport the model down to Swindon. And as you can see from below that was done this week and the model is now in place looking splendid. Just don’t ask us about the journey from hell down to Swindon on Monday this week to carry out the work! Lets just say both me and Chris set off very early and got back home very late that day!

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20170515_144300 20170515_162244 20170515_164904

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Should you want to come and visit our new updated stand at the National Selfbuild and Renovation Centre in Swindon then you will find the address here www.nsbrc.co.uk/contact-us. Even better, if you would like to come and have a chat with us here we’ll be exhibiting here this coming weekend from Friday 19th May to Sunday 21st May. All details can be found in the events section of this website.

FAQs

Ask CDI a Question

  • Q

    Do I keep my joist centres at 400mm when using Lewis Deck?

    A

    One of the great things about using Lewis Deck is that it opens up a number of different options for you and one of them is around joist centres you can work with.

    Traditionally we see the vast majority of architects and designers insisting that timber joists be installed at either 400mm or at most 600mm because this is the limit of what timber floor systems will effectively span to. Now with Lewis, because of its unique profile (with the dovetails dimensions) and the way it interacts with the thin (50mm) screed laid on it, you can actually go much wider than these figures.With a 50mm screed, on top of the sheets, Lewis allows you to have unpropped centres of up to 1200mm (1.2m). Even at these much wider centres Lewis will allow you to have a permissible load of 14.8kN/m2, which in English is just under 1.5 Tonnes per m2. Now this might sound fantastic, and it is, but in reality for 95% of new build homes this figure won't really make too much difference to what you were planning on doing with upstairs.What it does mean though is that at your normal centres, of approximately 600mm, your floor becomes so much stronger than traditional forms of floor structure that it allows you to do things on the 1st floor that you take for granted on the ground floor.First of all is the obvious one, you get a solid floor, meaning no more squeaky floor boards or hearing people walking around upstairs and knowing exactly where they are up there! Having the solid floor gives you the chance to have a very efficient underfloor heating system (see our applications section for more details) which in most cases will probably mean a slight reduction in your fuel bills.Other big benefits of having a stronger floor upstairs include being able to have either thinner tiles or much heavier tiles than you can use on timber floor systems. The screed and Lewis working together pretty much stops any deflection in the floor meaning that these types of tiles won't crack or move and lift over time as the floor doesn't move or deflect!So in conclusion yes you can have much wider joist centres than the 400mm centres that you normally see on new developments but even if you wanted to keep them the same by using Lewis Deck it opens up so many benefits that you just aren't able to incorporate with traditional timber floor systems. However the joist centres are usually controlled by the load capacity of the joist and not the spanning capacity of the Lewis Deck.

    Q

    Do you fix Lewis Deck down to the joists?

    A

    The short answer to this is no Lewis Deck doesn't have to be fixed down.

    Generally the reason why people choose to use Lewis Deck over more traditional floor systems is that they are looking to enhance the upper floor that they are working on. So if you are going to be looking at using Lewis then you might as well look to incorporate its full range of benefits. One of which is the major uplift in acoustic performance that you get from using the system.Getting the best results, acoustically, is achieved by laying the floor as a floating floor. This then creates separation between the supporting floor joists and and the steel deck. To enhance this further introduce a resilient strip on top of the joist. See below.[caption id="attachment_559" align="alignnone" width="300"]Lewis Metal Dovetailed Sheeting Deck with acoustic Sylomer resilient strips Lewis Metal Dovetailed Sheeting Deck with acoustic Sylomer resilient strips[/caption]When it comes to determining which of our acoustic resilient strips to use (because we have a few of them and they all do different jobs depending on the use of them and the type of structure below) we are happy to help you come up with the correct option that suits your project the best.A standard Lewis Deck floor detail (such as the detail above) easily achieves UK requirements for acoustic (as well as fire) resistance for residential separating floors. Higher performance standards are easily achievable too. Because of this we have seen Lewis Deck used frequently in in bespoke projects such as live music/ theatre venues, cinemas, recording studios, specialist test labs, plant room floors and many other commercial applications.Note: some joists my require lateral stability and therefore lateral restraint straps or timber noggins or a sacrificial timber board may be required to achieve this, your joist supplier or designer will be able to provide this information, in some cases the Lewis Deck can be fixed down to provide this action if required.Please feel free to give us a call and discuss this further should you wish to do so.

    Q

    Lacomet – How come it has no scrap value?

    A

    Lacomet – How come it has no scrap value?Many of the projects that we get involved in starts with a phone call or email to us from someone researching replacing stolen leadwork. Many of these are old buildings, such as schools or churches, where this isn’t the first time that the lead has been stolen and they call us fed up with having to replace it again full in the knowledge that they will more than likely go through the same problem once more in the near future if they continue to use lead.One of the big benefits that Lacomet FL brings to a project is the fact that it has no scrap value and therefore the chances of it being stolen are massively reduced.Due to the 2 thin aluminium layers, and its five layer total construction, it is of no value to thieves. Lacomet can be recycled but the polyester based coating would need to be de-laminated first and the amount of recovered aluminum is then very low, in fact it would be easier and more profitable to collect empty drinks cans than to mess about stripping Lacomet down. We can also supply stickers that can be placed in strategic locations informing people that what is now on the roof is not lead and that it has no scrap value.

  • Q

    Do you fix Lewis Deck down to the joists?

    A

    The short answer to this is no Lewis Deck doesn't have to be fixed down.

    Generally the reason why people choose to use Lewis Deck over more traditional floor systems is that they are looking to enhance the upper floor that they are working on. So if you are going to be looking at using Lewis then you might as well look to incorporate its full range of benefits. One of which is the major uplift in acoustic performance that you get from using the system.Getting the best results, acoustically, is achieved by laying the floor as a floating floor. This then creates separation between the supporting floor joists and and the steel deck. To enhance this further introduce a resilient strip on top of the joist. See below.[caption id="attachment_559" align="alignnone" width="300"]Lewis Metal Dovetailed Sheeting Deck with acoustic Sylomer resilient strips Lewis Metal Dovetailed Sheeting Deck with acoustic Sylomer resilient strips[/caption]When it comes to determining which of our acoustic resilient strips to use (because we have a few of them and they all do different jobs depending on the use of them and the type of structure below) we are happy to help you come up with the correct option that suits your project the best.A standard Lewis Deck floor detail (such as the detail above) easily achieves UK requirements for acoustic (as well as fire) resistance for residential separating floors. Higher performance standards are easily achievable too. Because of this we have seen Lewis Deck used frequently in in bespoke projects such as live music/ theatre venues, cinemas, recording studios, specialist test labs, plant room floors and many other commercial applications.Note: some joists my require lateral stability and therefore lateral restraint straps or timber noggins or a sacrificial timber board may be required to achieve this, your joist supplier or designer will be able to provide this information, in some cases the Lewis Deck can be fixed down to provide this action if required.Please feel free to give us a call and discuss this further should you wish to do so.

    Q

    Lacomet – How come it has no scrap value?

    A

    Lacomet – How come it has no scrap value?Many of the projects that we get involved in starts with a phone call or email to us from someone researching replacing stolen leadwork. Many of these are old buildings, such as schools or churches, where this isn’t the first time that the lead has been stolen and they call us fed up with having to replace it again full in the knowledge that they will more than likely go through the same problem once more in the near future if they continue to use lead.One of the big benefits that Lacomet FL brings to a project is the fact that it has no scrap value and therefore the chances of it being stolen are massively reduced.Due to the 2 thin aluminium layers, and its five layer total construction, it is of no value to thieves. Lacomet can be recycled but the polyester based coating would need to be de-laminated first and the amount of recovered aluminum is then very low, in fact it would be easier and more profitable to collect empty drinks cans than to mess about stripping Lacomet down. We can also supply stickers that can be placed in strategic locations informing people that what is now on the roof is not lead and that it has no scrap value.

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