Case Studies

Case Studies

What, when and why?

Recent projects that we have been involved in. Maybe one is similar to what you are working on? More case studies will be added from time to time.

Self-Build by Tim

Traditional concrete blockwork house that utilises the Lewis Deck to provide Acoustic and underfloor heating floors upstairs

Tim 1st visited our stand at the Swindon National Self-Build and Renovation Centre (NSBRC) early in 2015 and saw our stand, this started the conversation and we have been in touch ever since.  He took delivery of his Lewis Deck in June 2016 and installed it over the next couple of months.  The build continued with …

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Kingswood Warren Park Mansion House conversion

Kingswood manor house conversion to apartments utilising the Lewis Deck for the Acoustic and fire separating floors as well as the wet-room and underfloor heating solution.

The conversion of the Listed Mansion House on the Kingswood Manor estate in Surrey required very high performing acoustic floors for these very high quality apartments, the floors also needed to cope with the use of large format tiles, including marble without the danger of any deflection and cracking.  This was achieved using the Lewis …

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Insworke Mill Quay

Insworke Tidal Mill was originally built around the 1590’s and survived as a working Mill until just before the First World War. It then had a chequered life as various storage and manufacturing uses until it fell into total disrepair. It went under a major refurbishment and rebuild programme in 2011 to find a new …

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Lewis Deck to Everyman Cinema, Canary Wharf

The Everyman Cinema in Canary Wharf, London is one of a number of cinemas around the UK that has used Lewis Deck as the flooring system due to the amazing acoustic results that you get from it. When used in conjunction with a 50mm screed and Sylomer resilient acoustic strips with 100mm mineral wool insulation …

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Hody to Alexandra Dock

The scheme includes infilling one third of Alexandra Dock with 780,000 m3 of material and reclaiming 7.5 ha of the river to create a new 650m quay wall, which can accommodate three offshore wind installation vessels. Construction will also involve dredging a new berth pocket, completion of earthworks and surfacing, building internal access roads and …

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Lacomet to Reed Street

Sinclair meadows, Lewis Deck for very high performing acoustic floors and Lacomet FL for cedar roof flashings

South Shields recently became home to what may well be the most environmentally conscious street in Britain, Reed Street. The not-for-profit Four Housing Group has designed and built Sinclair Meadows, Reed Street – a carbon negative development that consists of 21 residences. Designed with the well-being of its residents in mind, the project prized the long-term benefits of green …

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Lacomet to The Riverside Clubhouse

Cedar Shingle roof with Lacomet FL non-lead flashing used for its corrosion resistance

This unique project which is constructed with solid spruce logs is the largest such construction of this method in the UK and one of the largest in Europe. The Russian log walling and glulam system had previously been assembled in Russia. Desertoak, the main contractor were on site for 23 weeks constructing the Frame. Desertoak …

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FastSlab GF System to Ingerthorpe Grange

FastSlab installation to the ground floor of this listed manor house, for a concrete feel over the basement and to include under floor heating

We were initially contacted by the main contractors engineer regarding the use of Lewis Deck to the ground floor of Ingerthorpe Grange. The building is a grade 2 listed property just outside of Ripon, North Yorkshire. The project was to completely renovate the internal areas of the house and bring it up to current standards. …

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Op-Deck to The Curly House

Initial project meetings first started in early 2008, the clients owned a small cottage on the site which had been extended several times during the 80’s and had permission to make further adaptations. The mixture of building standards meant that their home was extremely drafty and very energy inefficient. The site itself is particularly exposed. …

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FastSlab Foundation to Seadune

The land owners of Seadune contacted us as they were having planning using regarding the foundation design on their new house that they were looking to build. The site in question was very close to the coast and they were effectively building on the beach. As such the planners required the building to have foundations …

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Lewis Deck to The Old Post Office, Brockhall Village

Plot 1, The Old Post Office, Brockhall Village is a self build home for a director of a local construction company. We were contacted, in September 2016, by a very enthusiastic individual who had used Lewis Deck previously on a commercial project in the Bolton area of Lancashire. After seeing how easy it was to …

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Lewis Deck to Bellwood Park, Perth

We were asked to initially advise on potential solutions for creating an underfloor heating system to the upper floor of the property at Bellwood Park. As it was in a remote location and off the grid for mains gas the house was to be heated by a heat pump and so efficiency was a major …

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FAQs

Ask CDI a Question

  • Q

    Do I keep my joist centres at 400mm when using Lewis Deck?

    A

    One of the great things about using Lewis Deck is that it opens up a number of different options for you and one of them is around joist centres you can work with.

    Traditionally we see the vast majority of architects and designers insisting that timber joists be installed at either 400mm or at most 600mm because this is the limit of what timber floor systems will effectively span to. Now with Lewis, because of its unique profile (with the dovetails dimensions) and the way it interacts with the thin (50mm) screed laid on it, you can actually go much wider than these figures. With a 50mm screed, on top of the sheets, Lewis allows you to have unpropped centres of up to 1200mm (1.2m). Even at these much wider centres Lewis will allow you to have a permissible load of 14.8kN/m2, which in English is just under 1.5 Tonnes per m2. Now this might sound fantastic, and it is, but in reality for 95% of new build homes this figure won't really make too much difference to what you were planning on doing with upstairs. What it does mean though is that at your normal centres, of approximately 600mm, your floor becomes so much stronger than traditional forms of floor structure that it allows you to do things on the 1st floor that you take for granted on the ground floor. First of all is the obvious one, you get a solid floor, meaning no more squeaky floor boards or hearing people walking around upstairs and knowing exactly where they are up there! Having the solid floor gives you the chance to have a very efficient underfloor heating system (see our applications section for more details) which in most cases will probably mean a slight reduction in your fuel bills. Other big benefits of having a stronger floor upstairs include being able to have either thinner tiles or much heavier tiles than you can use on timber floor systems. The screed and Lewis working together pretty much stops any deflection in the floor meaning that these types of tiles won't crack or move and lift over time as the floor doesn't move or deflect! So in conclusion yes you can have much wider joist centres than the 400mm centres that you normally see on new developments but even if you wanted to keep them the same by using Lewis Deck it opens up so many benefits that you just aren't able to incorporate with traditional timber floor systems. However the joist centres are usually controlled by the load capacity of the joist and not the spanning capacity of the Lewis Deck.

    Q

    Do you fix Lewis Deck down to the joists?

    A

    The short answer to this is no Lewis Deck doesn't have to be fixed down.

    Generally the reason why people choose to use Lewis Deck over more traditional floor systems is that they are looking to enhance the upper floor that they are working on. So if you are going to be looking at using Lewis then you might as well look to incorporate its full range of benefits. One of which is the major uplift in acoustic performance that you get from using the system. Getting the best results, acoustically, is achieved by laying the floor as a floating floor. This then creates separation between the supporting floor joists and and the steel deck. To enhance this further introduce a resilient strip on top of the joist. See below. [caption id="attachment_559" align="alignnone" width="300"]Lewis Metal Dovetailed Sheeting Deck with acoustic Sylomer resilient strips Lewis Metal Dovetailed Sheeting Deck with acoustic Sylomer resilient strips[/caption] When it comes to determining which of our acoustic resilient strips to use (because we have a few of them and they all do different jobs depending on the use of them and the type of structure below) we are happy to help you come up with the correct option that suits your project the best. A standard Lewis Deck floor detail (such as the detail above) easily achieves UK requirements for acoustic (as well as fire) resistance for residential separating floors. Higher performance standards are easily achievable too. Because of this we have seen Lewis Deck used frequently in in bespoke projects such as live music/ theatre venues, cinemas, recording studios, specialist test labs, plant room floors and many other commercial applications. Note: some joists my require lateral stability and therefore lateral restraint straps or timber noggins or a sacrificial timber board may be required to achieve this, your joist supplier or designer will be able to provide this information, in some cases the Lewis Deck can be fixed down to provide this action if required. Please feel free to give us a call and discuss this further should you wish to do so.

    Q

    Lacomet – How come it has no scrap value?

    A

    Lacomet – How come it has no scrap value? Many of the projects that we get involved in starts with a phone call or email to us from someone researching replacing stolen leadwork. Many of these are old buildings, such as schools or churches, where this isn’t the first time that the lead has been stolen and they call us fed up with having to replace it again full in the knowledge that they will more than likely go through the same problem once more in the near future if they continue to use lead. One of the big benefits that Lacomet FL brings to a project is the fact that it has no scrap value and therefore the chances of it being stolen are massively reduced. Due to the 2 thin aluminium layers, and its five layer total construction, it is of no value to thieves. Lacomet can be recycled but the polyester based coating would need to be de-laminated first and the amount of recovered aluminum is then very low, in fact it would be easier and more profitable to collect empty drinks cans than to mess about stripping Lacomet down. We can also supply stickers that can be placed in strategic locations informing people that what is now on the roof is not lead and that it has no scrap value.

  • Q

    Do you fix Lewis Deck down to the joists?

    A

    The short answer to this is no Lewis Deck doesn't have to be fixed down.

    Generally the reason why people choose to use Lewis Deck over more traditional floor systems is that they are looking to enhance the upper floor that they are working on. So if you are going to be looking at using Lewis then you might as well look to incorporate its full range of benefits. One of which is the major uplift in acoustic performance that you get from using the system. Getting the best results, acoustically, is achieved by laying the floor as a floating floor. This then creates separation between the supporting floor joists and and the steel deck. To enhance this further introduce a resilient strip on top of the joist. See below. [caption id="attachment_559" align="alignnone" width="300"]Lewis Metal Dovetailed Sheeting Deck with acoustic Sylomer resilient strips Lewis Metal Dovetailed Sheeting Deck with acoustic Sylomer resilient strips[/caption] When it comes to determining which of our acoustic resilient strips to use (because we have a few of them and they all do different jobs depending on the use of them and the type of structure below) we are happy to help you come up with the correct option that suits your project the best. A standard Lewis Deck floor detail (such as the detail above) easily achieves UK requirements for acoustic (as well as fire) resistance for residential separating floors. Higher performance standards are easily achievable too. Because of this we have seen Lewis Deck used frequently in in bespoke projects such as live music/ theatre venues, cinemas, recording studios, specialist test labs, plant room floors and many other commercial applications. Note: some joists my require lateral stability and therefore lateral restraint straps or timber noggins or a sacrificial timber board may be required to achieve this, your joist supplier or designer will be able to provide this information, in some cases the Lewis Deck can be fixed down to provide this action if required. Please feel free to give us a call and discuss this further should you wish to do so.

    Q

    Lacomet – How come it has no scrap value?

    A

    Lacomet – How come it has no scrap value? Many of the projects that we get involved in starts with a phone call or email to us from someone researching replacing stolen leadwork. Many of these are old buildings, such as schools or churches, where this isn’t the first time that the lead has been stolen and they call us fed up with having to replace it again full in the knowledge that they will more than likely go through the same problem once more in the near future if they continue to use lead. One of the big benefits that Lacomet FL brings to a project is the fact that it has no scrap value and therefore the chances of it being stolen are massively reduced. Due to the 2 thin aluminium layers, and its five layer total construction, it is of no value to thieves. Lacomet can be recycled but the polyester based coating would need to be de-laminated first and the amount of recovered aluminum is then very low, in fact it would be easier and more profitable to collect empty drinks cans than to mess about stripping Lacomet down. We can also supply stickers that can be placed in strategic locations informing people that what is now on the roof is not lead and that it has no scrap value.

Ask CDI a Question

Latest Events

and Exhibitions

Latest Blog

CDI 2017

Granite tiles and shower tray laid over a Lewis Deck and Concrete floor upstairs over timber joists

Travertine wetroom by Craig Bills

30th May 2017

Craig Bills is a master tiler and has been installing wet-rooms using Lewis Deck and concrete for over 20 years, he is a passionate advocate for the Lewis Deck system in wet-rooms and bathrooms as it give an opportunity for the floor to be 1 piece of waterproofed concrete.  This makes a very robust and …

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We've a new model down at Swindon!

18th May 2017

One of the great benefits that you get from introducing Lewis Deck into a residential development is the option to install a wet room floor into bathroom/ en-suite areas with extreme ease compared to other flooring systems as well as maintaining one solid concrete slab in the room reducing the possibility of leaks from a …

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